Category Archives: Poetry

Poem: “A Package of Seeds” by Edgar A. Guest

In his poem (below), “A Package of Seeds,” Edgar A. Guest captures how easily we take for granted the amazing life force within a simple seed. He highlights how seeds are “a miracle of life” — a power that no one person here on this earth can create.

We at Grow Your Health Gardening stress the importance of every step in preserving the life of the seed we grow whether we are harvesting or collecting seeds, or patiently drying, handling, storing, or transporting the seeds we grow. We think it is essential to keep in mind at all times that inside each seed is not only a dormant baby plant but contains encased in this tiny capsule called a seed, intricate code that carries on the next generation of nourishing food perfectly fit for our body. And it is continually amazing to me that this seed already has everything it needs to grow the moment it is given the opportunity.

The healthier the plant while it lives without succumbing to pest, disease or chemicals from the environment, the stronger the code of its DNA. The more the plant is adapted to it’s growing environment, the stronger the code of its DNA. The more care in watching how much a seed experiences moisture and temperature fluctuations while in storage, the healthier the seedling which leads to stronger code of its DNA. Russel H. Conwell understood the importance of starting with good seed when he said, “I ask not for a larger garden, but for finer seeds.

I ask not for a larger garden, but for finer seeds. —Russell H. Conwell (1843-1925)

Finer seeds… What is the value of good health? I say it begins and ends with finer seeds. We should not take for granted good organically grown seed that will nourish our body. It should be treasured.

It’s amazing how much inflation has affected the price of seed lately, but still in the greater scheme of things, seed is still effectively quite inexpensive compared to ready-to-purchase produce. As I came across this poem today while doing some research I thought it was a good time to pause and just remind myself what an amazing gift these plants are to our body. And by the way… here in zone 7B, it’s time to plant poppies and pansies! 😉 What one thing will you do today to grow your health gardening?

Cheers! — Erin


“A Package of Seeds”

Edgar A. Guest, Poet who wrote poem “A Package of Seeds”.

I paid a dime for a package of seeds
And the clerk tossed them out with a flip.
“We’ve got ‘em assorted for every man’s needs,”
He said with a smile on his lip.“
Pansies and poppies and asters and peas!
Ten cents a package and pick as you please!” 

Now seeds are just dimes to the man in the store
And dimes are the things he needs;
And I’ve been to buy them in seasons before,
But have thought of them merely as seeds.
But it flashed through my mind as I took them this time“
You have purchased a miracle here for a dime!” 

“You’ve a dime’s worth of power no man can create,
You’ve a dime’s worth of life in your hand!
You’ve a dime’s worth of mystery, destiny, fate,
Which the wisest cannot understand.
In this bright little package, now isn’t it odd?
You’ve a dime’s worth of something known only to God. 

—Edgar Albert Guest
Poet (1881–1959)
British Born and American Immigrant who was often referred to in his time as the “The Poet of the People”. He published more than twenty volumes of poetry and was thought to have written over 11,000 poems.

Source:

  1. https://poets.org/poet/edgar-guest

Poem | The Loveliness of spring

POEM: THE LOVELINESS OF SPRING

Reminiscent melodies
serenade the morning breeze.

Feathered creatures nest with care
in cherry blossoms pink and fair.

Perfumed scent of roses flow.
Tiny blades of green grass grow.

Misty showers soak the earth, 
glorious colors come to birth.

Gathering clouds come and go, 
rain, sun, and vibrant bow.

Dainty petals, fancy flair, 
dancing in the warm, sweet air.

Violets, yellows, purest white, 
graceful, gentle, welcomed sight.

Thank you, oh sweet lovely Spring, 
patiently waiting the charms you bring!

— Poem by Patricia L. Cisco

Published 2018 Family Friend Poems

Garden Poetry | “Garden of Gold” by Lois E. Felder

Garden Of Gold

I walk through the garden,
On this warm summer’s day,
To smell the flowers,
That grandma raised.

In the middle,
Of this garden of gold,
Stood this one,
Single red stem rose,
The rose means so many things,
From the ones you receive on your wedding day,
To the one you get on Valentine’s Day,
But this single rose standing here today,
Represents the love grandma gave.

From the love she gave,
When she planted it that day,
To the love she gave us,
Each and every day,
So when you pass this garden of gold,
Remember the love that this rose holds.

— Lois E. Felder

Garden Poetry | “The Seven Of Pentacles” by Marge Piercy

The Seven Of Pentacles

Under a sky the color of pea soup
she is looking at her work growing away there
actively, thickly like grapevines or pole beans
as things grow in the real world, slowly enough.
If you tend them properly, if you mulch, if you water,
if you provide birds that eat insects a home and winter food,
if the sun shines and you pick off caterpillars,
if the praying mantis comes and the ladybugs and the bees,
then the plants flourish, but at their own internal clock.

Connections are made slowly, sometimes they grow underground.
You cannot tell always by looking what is happening.
More than half the tree is spread out in the soil under your feet.
Penetrate quietly as the earthworm that blows no trumpet.
Fight persistently as the creeper that brings down the tree.
Spread like the squash plant that overruns the garden.
Gnaw in the dark and use the sun to make sugar.

Weave real connections, create real nodes, build real houses.
Live a life you can endure: Make love that is loving.
Keep tangling and interweaving and taking more in,
a thicket and bramble wilderness to the outside but to us 
interconnected with rabbit runs and burrows and lairs.

Live as if you liked yourself, and it may happen:
reach out, keep reaching out, keep bringing in.
This is how we are going to live for a long time: not always,
for every gardener knows that after the digging, after
the planting,
after the long season of tending and growth, the harvest comes.

Marge Piercy