Tag Archives: seed starting

Why Now is the Time to Get Your Seeds for Warm Season and Fall Plantings

Here in Atlanta, Georgia, we are beginning to see warmer days in the mid-80ºs (F) which means hot summer days are just around the corner starting in early to mid-May. 

With that in mind, we are doing a last call on all spring seed sales so that our seeds do not get damaged in transit by the high heat of shipping containers. High heat can dramatically affect the life of a seed (and even kill good seed), so we recommend our customers purchase purchase seeds during cooler conditions across the United States before the southern shipping lanes get hot.

Now is the time to stock-up on seeds for warm season crops and fall planting!
And for a limited time you can
get 20% all seed orders*
with code
BEATTHESHIPPINGHEAT

store.growyourhealthgardening.com

*Limited to stock on hand. No Cash Value. 
Offer valid 4/23/22-4/30/22.

Example of how Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co packaging and how they ship seed orders

Remember, our seeds are:

  • packaged in a water-resistant sealed envelope to protect your seeds from rain and moisture.
  • packaged in a non-descript envelope and shipped with tracking to limit stolen and lost packages. (Believe it or not, we have a handful of seed orders that mysteriously go missing when we don’t ship with tracking, so now we only ship using tracking!)
  • when local temps begin to go above 75ºF, our packages are always hand-delivered to the U.S.P.S. — your seed order never will sit out in a hot mail box or metal mail collection box that is exposed to the sun and heat. (And be sure that where ever you ship your seeds is climate-controlled so they will not be sitting out in the heat while waiting for you to receive your order.) 😉
  • Grown with love and care on our family small farm using organic methods — many are hydroponic adapted.
  • Heirloom or open source seed (OSSI) so you can have confidence in food security and encourage diversity in your own garden and sharing with friends (patent-free seeds!)
Save 20% on seeds

With daily heat temps rising in the southeast, we are going to be limiting our shipments in mid-May to protect seeds from heat damage during transit. Be sure and secure your heirloom and open source seed now before summer and fall!

SHOP SEEDS NOW

Grow Your Health Gardening Awarded April Star Seller for Excellent Customer Service

Grow Your Health Gardening (GYHG) Seed Co. has been awarded the April Star Seller on Etsy for the fourth consecutive month in a row in 2022! Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co. received a 100 percent score in every category for exemplary customer service.

Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co. specializes in growing all their own hydroponic-adapted seeds and seeds adapted to being grown in the soil in the Southeast Zone 7B. Even though Grow Your Health Seed Co. sells on Etsy, their main online store can be found on store.GrowYourHealthGardening.com along with the latest releases and updates, how-tos, and more.

Etsy Star Seller for April 2022
100 percent Response Rate
100% Shipping Time
100 percent 5 star ratings
Etsy Star Seller 100 percent customer satisfaction

Here are a few things our customer’s have shared with us over the past month:

“Seeds look great will be planting soon! Fast shipping and good communication. Clean light colored and not dark. I recommend this seller. I will be back!” — Gigi

“Amazing customer service- they always go above & beyond! I love their seeds too- highest quality, hand selected and always packed with care. They always offer growing help and sent extra growing information and some free goodies with my order too. i LOVE this company and always shop here first when i’m ready to get growing!” — Gabrielle

“This shop is always amazing. They ship fast and the seeds always grow! I’ll be back for more!” —Karen

“Thank you for your fast shipping, beautiful packaging and helpful instructions. I can not wait to plant them with the rest of my seeds indoors tonight.” — Donielle

“100% germination rate 👍” — Laurie

“Very fast and great condition 💚” — Nita

“These have ALL sprouted beautifully in about 2 weeks! I will definitely be purchasing more seeds!” — Skylar

“The shipping was so fast and I loved the little info leaflet that was sent with the seeds. So far every single seed has germinated and the sprouts are looking great! Every seed has germinated and sprouted so far. Very happy! Very pleased.” 
—Laura

“We just want to thank our customers who trusted us as their seed source this growing season! We appreciate your support of our small family business!” said Erin Castillo, Owner of Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co. “Providing locally adapted seed to our community and across the United States is something we take great joy and pride in.”

Be Sure to Check this Chart Before Starting from Seed

Seed starting?

We have a FANTASTIC resource you will want to bookmark. It tells you what conditions the particular variety needs to help it germinate. Some seeds need it dark. Some seeds need bright light to germinate. Some need to be soaked beforehand. No matter the situation, this is where you want to start.

This is an active reference we update from time-to-time as we learn through researching and growing new varieties. Be sure to bookmark the page and check back for updates! https://growyourhealthgardening.com/seeds-that-require-special-treatment/

And remember, when you start from seed, even though you are taking a bit of a gamble on some seeds, the thing that is so awesome is you can grow varieties not commonly found at big-box retail garden centers. A whole new world awaits you!

Oh — and if you’re new to seed starting, be sure to check the “Seed Starting” tab on our Web site for other helpful tips to help you in your quest to start seeds at home.

Hope this helps!

How to ensure you have Germinated Seed Every Time whether Growing in Soil or Hydroponics

I like to know if a seed has germinated before it ever goes into soil or a piece of hydroponic Rockwool. There’s an easy way to know if you have viable seed and that is through a technique that simply requires a sheet of paper towel, a container with a lid, water and a consistently warm location 72ºF-76ºF. You can learn more about how to set up these pre-germination conditions on our blog here, but if you’re already familiar with this method, here is a quick visual of what you’re looking for with pepper seeds and when to transfer them to either soil or Rockwool (Rockwool is used for soilless hydroponic / aeroponic growing systems).

Example of seed that is ready to transfer to Rockwool or soil

The seed that is circled in green is ready to gently transfer to soil or Rockwool using a sanitized tweezer. (To sanitize your tweezer, simply clean with rubbing alcohol.) The seed circled in yellow shows swelling and indicates that you should probably check it the next day as the root is getting ready to emerge.

The other seeds are slightly swollen showing that they are still in the process of germinating. Do not give up on seeds that are slower to germinate — sometimes they can take up to 10 days even when you are providing ideal conditions. Check moisture daily and if paper towel smells funky, swap out for a new paper towel and rewet and put back into germination chamber container.

Below is a photo showing germinated seed that has been placed into Rockwool (see number one below). If you are growing in a hydroponic growing system such as a Tower Garden or Aerogarden, you’ll want to place your seed in Rockwool instead of soil. (Coco Coir is also a good alternative growing medium for hydroponics or aeroponics assuming it has support to hold material together such as in a mesh net.)

I like to cover my seeds with vermiculite. Some hydroponic growers insist that this step isn’t necessary, but I like to make sure my seeds receive adequate moisture throughout these early stages of growth especially. Strong healthy seedlings, make for strong healthy plants. I use this process for peppertomato, and eggplant seeds and any seeds that are not super small. Remember, some seeds need light to germinate (like lettuce), so be sure to reference our cheat sheet before starting seeds to know if your seed needs light, no light, or if it doesn’t matter.

How to transfer pre-germinated Seed to Rockwool or Soil

Rockwool is a fantastic growing medium as it has air pockets and is good at holding water. Keep moist, but not sitting in water.

Hope that helps! Remember, we have a great assortment of hydroponic-adapted tomato and pepper seed available in the seed store. Be sure to check it out!

Happy growing,

Erin

watering can

Preserved 1,000-Year-Old Corn and How to Properly Store Your Seeds

I was reading an article over on AgWeb the other day on how an unnamed Mancos rancher found an estimated 1,000 year-old 10″-tall coiled hand-pinched utilitarian-style clay pot in a cave, kept it on his mantle for several decades and then sold it to Mr. Steve Campbell who discovered it’s valuable contents.

Come to find out, the clay pot held a nearly five pound cache of phenomenally well-preserved indigenous corn that contains a gene that helps the corn fix nitrogen from the air! Campbell has donated some of his corn as samples to several universities for further study.

“Unbelievable and beyond rare,” Steve Campbell says. “Never dreamed I’d see anything like this pot. No doubt, this corn was someone’s last harvest and they never came back for it.”
( Photo courtesy of Steve Campbell)
“Unbelievable and beyond rare,” Steve Campbell says. “Never dreamed I’d see anything like this pot. No doubt, this corn was someone’s last harvest and they never came back for it.”
( Photo courtesy of Steve Campbell)

The hope is that this lost trait of nitrogen fixing in corn could be possibly re-introduced into current varieties, thereby reducing the fertilizer needs of a modern crop. “The scientists want to know how this particular corn grew so well and if it’s now extinct,” Campbell says. The question will be whether this will improve GMO corn or create other issues. Hopefully some researchers will be able to adapt the corn through natural means instead of genetic manipulation.

You can read more about this amazing find on AgWeb Farm Journal.

“The corn kernels are in about perfect condition,” says Campbell. “No moisture, no sun, and sealed in that pot for 1,000 years, the corn looks like you can’t believe.” (Photo courtesy of Steve Campbell)

Just like Mr. Campbell’s corn seed example, your own personal seed supply can be kept viable for extended lengths of time given the proper storage conditions. All seed has a life-span, but with a little know-how, you can dramatically lengthen the life of your seed and preserve your investment.

Here’s what you will want to do whenever you purchase new seed from Grow Your Health Gardening or other seed stewards:

Immediately place your seed packet(s) in a sealed glass container and store in a location that is consistently cool, dark, and dry within your home. We recommend placing your seeds (along with an oxygen absorber) in a wide-mouth glass Mason jar with a screw-on lid and keep in your refrigerator until its time to plant. Humidity levels for seed storage should be below 60% at all times. A general rule of thumb is that temperature + humidity level should not ever exceed 100%. Even lowering the temp of your seed by one degree can make a world of difference.

And when it does come time to plant, do not leave seed packets out and exposed to the sun. We also recommend using glass containers that seal with a metal lid as rodents can chew through plastic lids/containers. When you are finished starting your seed, immediately return remaining seed packet(s) to a protected environment as indicated above.

Taking these steps can dramatically extend the life of your seed investment! Hope that helps! Have a fantastic growing season y’all! (And get those seed orders wrapped up now, so you don’t risk shipping seed in warm weather conditions!)

—Erin

Owner, Grow Your Health Gardening & GYHG Seed Co

Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Company Star Seller Second Consecutive Month-in-a-Row

Grow Your Health Gardening (GYHG) Seed Co. has been identified as February Star Seller on Etsy for the second consecutive month of 2022 and received a perfect score of 100 percent in every category for exemplary customer service. 

To achieve “Star Seller of the Month” status, orders had a perfect score offering on-time shipping guidelines 100% of the time (a one day turn-around with USPS tracking on every order), communication response within 24 hours was 100% of the time, and Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co. received 100% 5-Star Ratings from customers who received their seed orders. We provide the same wonderful service on our online store! (Which is our primary store.)

Grow Your Health Gardening receives Etsy Star Seller of the Month Award for February 2022

Here’s some of what our customers are saying about Grow Your Health Gardener Seed Co.’s service and quality grow with organic methods seeds: 

★★★★★ 
“These small seeds arrived in great shape. I planted just a few of them right away. They are already coming up! I am so happy with these rare tomato seeds!” — Sully

★★★★★ 
“My seeds came perfectly marked with a lovely thank you note and a helpful chart of past repelling plants. I could not be happier with my purchase and cannot wait to plant my little seeds with my kids and watch them grow. Thank you!!!” — Crystal

★★★★★ 
“Got here really quickly! Would buy form again! Can’t wait to start growing ^_^!” — xstiney

★★★★★ 
“Wonderful seed company with lots of information that comes with your seed order. Also check out the website. They have tone of wonderful seeds and information on it.” — Royal W

To purchase hydroponic-adapted seeds and seeds grown in the soil in the Southeast Zone 7B, you can order on Etsy.com or better yet, for the latest updates and product releases visit Grow Your Health Gardening‘s online store.

Live screenshot of Etsy Star Seller Dashboard for Grow Your Health Gardening

The Star Seller badge is Etsy’s way of recognizing sellers with a proven record of providing a great customer experience. To become a Star Seller, your store must meet certain criteria for messages, shipping, ratings, orders, and sales. If these core fundamentals of delivering great customer service are achieved, a shop may receive a badge that shows buyers that a shop has consistently provided an excellent customer experience.

Which one will perform the best? 1) Worm castings, 2) Activated Charcoal, 3) Both 4) Neither?

I’m scheduled to give a “Tomato Talk” to a local group of community members who are interested in growing their own tomatoes from seed in the next 10 days and in the process for preparing for this talk, I thought I’d do a little soil test for what makes for a strong seedling and share it with y’all as things grow so that you can grow your health through gardening and learn tips for what I learn along the way. 😉

I took four (4) 4-pack planting trays and used the same batch of sifted soil for all four packs. The control 4-pack is straight up soil only. The second 4-pack I amended the soil with worm castings only. The third 4-pack I amended the soil with activated charcoal from a company I heard about and am trialing their product before bringing it to sell in our store and online. The fourth 4-pack soil is amended with the same ratio of worm castings as the second 4-pack as well as the same ration of the third 4-pack of soil with activated charcoal (so this final 4-pack has both amendments in it.)

A glimpse of our current seedling test subjects.

I then repeated the same amendments in another batch of similar soil, but put it in a soil block and amended certain soil blocks with worm castings only and activated charcoal castings only and a mix of both worm castings and activated charcoal. I also included rock wool just to compare growth of seed in this substrate as well. The rock wool will need to have kelp diluted and added to it as the seedlings grow as the rock wool is pH neutral and is devoid of nutrients.

For plants, I chose seed that was from the same lot, same harvest, same parent plant. All seed is our homegrown line of seed that we’ve saved and developed season after season, so I am confident that we have good strong seed stock to run the test. I chose to plant microdwarf tomatoes, because we are in the middle of winter here in Atlanta, Georgia and I can grow micro-dwarf tomatoes indoors under lights and evaluate results before our busy season of the summer harvest begins. We selected different micro dwarf tomato cultivars including Florida Petite Microdwarf Cherry Tomato, Rosy Finch Microdwarf Cherry Tomato, Aztek Microdwarf Cherry Tomato and Venus Microdwarf Cherry Tomato.

Rosy Finch Micro Dwarf Tomato Seedlings pop out of the soil ready to reach for the light.
This is a Fiskars Soil Block that is a plunger style and easy to use. You can make soil blocks of four or one larger soil block.
Setting the first soil block with the other four 4-pack trays already finished and planted.
Small bits of Activated Charcoal in equal parts and mixed thoroughly in each 4-pack of soil as well as equal parts of worm castings mixed well in 4-packs of soil keeping things as consistent as possible. We are testing to see if the activated charcoal makes any significant difference before carrying a product in our store. Stay tuned!

To gauge results, we will weigh all produced fruit and count the number of blossoms and the number of final fruit set by each tomato plant. I will do my absolute best to give equal amounts of water by first measuring what each plant is given and offering the same amount to each plant.

My hypothesis is that the air pruning action of the soil blocked starts will produce stronger seedlings for transplanting in the long run because when that root hits the air, it will signal to the plant to produce roots on the interior of the soil elsewhere. More roots will mean the plant has more opportunities to take up moisture and nutrients in the long run. I also think the soil block with BOTH worm castings and activated charcoal will perform the best because the worm castings will further any biological activity that may be happening within the soil and “cling” to the activated charcoal which the plant can tap as it needs.

That’s my best guess, but I could be wrong! We shall see what plays out in our little science experiment. What do you think will perform the best and why? Tell us in the comments below!

Happy Growing!
Erin

GYHG Seed Co. Receives Star Seller for January 2022

Grow Your Health Gardening (GYHG) Seed Co. was identified as Star Seller on Etsy for January 2022. To achieve Star Seller of the Month status, orders met on-time shipping guidelines, communication response within 24 hours was 100% of the time, and Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co. received 100% 5-Star Ratings from customers who received their seed orders.

Here’s some of what our customers are saying about Grow Your Health Gardener Seed Co.’s service and quality grow with organic methods seeds:

★★★★★ “Wonderful seed company with lots of information that comes with your seed order. Also check out their website. They have ton of wonderful seeds and information on it.” — Royal W

★★★★★ 
Liked that a lot of this company’s seeds are adapted to hydroponics. Love the large selection of heirloom cherry tomatoes which should be perfect for my large indoor Aerogarden. I haven’t had a chance to start any yet, but will try to update review once I do.” — Danielle H.

★★★★★ 
Seeds look great. Looks like a huge tomato can’t wait for a tomato sandwich I’m looking forward to spring to plant. Thanks for the gift pack of seeds!!
—GiGi

★★★★★
Not only was a cute piece of tape holding my seeds, a note was hand written. The best part, it came with a chart of repellent plants for pests. Put of all my orders, this was the best.
— Davena

★★★★★ 
Arrived quickly and was very well packaged, thank you so much!” 
—Kate

★★★★★ 
Can’t wait to buy again
—Allen 

★★★★★ 
Awesome service on all the seeds I bought. So excited to watch these guys grow! 🙂” 
—Anna 

★★★★★ 
Super fast shipping can’t wait to plant these thank you!!!” 
— Lushes Lips Lotions

★★★★★
Purchased several seeds, and received them all safely, including a gift pack of calypso bean seeds. Very friendly, easy to communicate, and the seeds came packaged very neatly. I truly enjoyed shopping from this company. Thank you!
— Carrie C. 

★★★★★ 
The seeds shipped promptly and were well packaged. I planted them three days ago and two have already sprouted.” 
— Be Sure to Loop

★★★★★ 
Seeds came quickly. I can’t wait to grow them in my hydroponic setup.” 
—Christine G.

To purchase hydroponic-adapted seeds and soil-grown seeds grown in the Southeast Zone 7B, you can order on Etsy.com or visit Grow Your Health Gardening.

The Star Seller badge is Etsy’s way of recognizing sellers with a proven record of providing a great customer experience. To become a Star Seller, your store must meet certain criteria for messages, shipping, ratings, orders, and sales. 

If these core fundamentals of delivering great customer service are achieved, a shop may receive a badge that shows buyers that a shop has consistently provided an excellent customer experience.

USPS Increasing Rates—Best to order seed before Jan 8

Just a friendly reminder that the United States Postal Service (USPS) will be raising their rates yet again and the new rates will go into effect on January 9th

All that to say, if you want to beat increased shipping charges on any order, be sure to order before January 8th! And as always, we cover the cost of shipping on all seed orders over $35 at Grow Your Health Gardening Seed Co.

• First Class Package Service will increase by $.06–$.07 USD in the 1–4oz weights.

• Domestic Priority Mail and Priority Mail Express rates will increase by an average of 3.1%.

• First Class Mail Flats and Letters will remain unchanged in 2022. 

You can learn more on the USPS website.

We mail our packages with tracking keeping mindful of protecting seeds and watching temperatures that the seed experiences during transit. The cold winter months are an ideal time to purchase your seed as heat from shipping containers can damage or in extreme heat situations actually kill viable good seed.

And remember, we are a small business that simply focuses on growing the best seed money can buy. We are not a shipping company. Know that we will make every effort to make sure your seed investment gets to you safely, but once we mail your seed order, USPS takes the “baton” so to speak, and is responsible for ensuring that the service you paid for will be carried out.

So, if you don’t plan on spending over $35, you will want to get that seed order in before Saturday, January 8. We will ship all current seed orders taken in over the New Year Holiday on Monday, January 3, 2022 when USPS receives mail again.

Looking forward along with you, {{ data.customer.first_name|default:’my friend’ }} , to the growing season ahead! Happy New Year!

Erin
Owner and Lead Grower
Grow Your Health Gardening

PS: Did you know that researchers have found that sending a handwritten note boosts positive emotions and well-being of both the letter-writing “expresser” and the recipient when they receive a hand written note or card in the mail? Consider pausing for 15 minutes today to send a quick note through the mail to someone you love to remind them you are thinking about them and care. It’s good for your health as well! 🙂

PSS: What new plant will you learn to grow this year?

8 Reasons GMOs are not good for our food system (and gardens)

Know that there shouldn’t be GMO seed available to consumers and is sold to producers only at this time, but you need to be aware of what is happening in our food supply chain as it could affect you in what you consume from the grocery store.

With genetically modified organisms (GMOs), we risk transforming our food into a patented commodity controlled by a few multinationals, and stripping farmers and consumers of their rights. GMOs are unreliable from a scientific point of view, inefficient in economic terms and unsustainable in an environmental analysis. Little is known about them from a health perspective and from a technical standpoint they are obsolete.

What are GMOs?

A GMO is an organism in which a gene belonging to one species is transferred to the DNA of another – for example a bacterium to a plant. This process cannot occur in nature through breeding or natural genetic cross over.

What aren’t they?

Supporters of GMOs would like to make consumers believe that they have always existed. In reality, they are intentionally confusing the genetic engineering that produces GMOs with other biotechnologies such as grafting, interbreeding, seed propagation, etc. These techniques, some of which are thousands of years old, actually underlie the fundamental developments made by agriculture and humanity itself. GMOs are born exclusively in laboratories; there is no way in which they can be created in nature.

Some stats on GMOs

  • 14 million agriculturists across 25 nations plant genetically modified seeds on 134 million hectares. (2009 data).
  • Of the crops grown worldwide, GMOs represent 77% of the soya, 49% of cotton, 26% of corn and 21% of rapeseed. This is a clear sign of the great decrease in biodiversity on cultivated land.
  • In the first phase of GMO cultivation, between 1996 and 2005, they were used primarily across the Americas. Since 2006 however, the greatest growth has occurred in Asia and Africa.
  • GMOs have been around for 30 years, with the first GMO plant dating back to 1981. But after a great amount of research, in practice only four GMO plants are being used commercially – soya, cotton, corn and rapeseed – and only two characteristics have been integrated: tolerance to herbicides and resistance to insects.


1. GMOs don’t feed the world

99% of GMO crops are not destined for human food, but rather for animal feed and biofuels. Land dedicated to growing GMOs is being expanded at the expense of food production.

2. It is not true that GMOs are more productive

GMOs have not increased productivity. According to official data from the United States Department of Agriculture, there has been no recorded increase in the soya and corn yield following the introduction of GMOs to American agriculture.

3. GMOs do not reduce the use of chemical products

Genetically modified plants are resistant to specific herbicides. For example, Monsanto sells genetically modified corn seeds and also sells Roundup Ready, an extremely potent herbicide that is the only one able to be used with cultivation of this corn. However, using Roundup on the GMO fields doesn’t eliminate all of the weeds: some resist the herbicide and this resistance is strengthened with each generation. These weeds become problematic and new chemical products must be invented to deal with them.

According to the Environment Working Group (EWG) this is a problem and why they, as a ‘think tank’ to monitor the government’s role in managing this with our food system.

“Nearly all corn and soybeans in the U.S. – totaling more than 150 million acres – are genetically engineered to withstand glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup. But over-reliance on glyphosate has led to the growth of “super weeds” that are resistant to the weed killer. Today, more than 60 million acres of U.S. farmland are infested with weeds resistant to glyphosate.

Because of this super weed problem, farmers are turning  to a chemical cocktail of glyphosate and 2,4-D, a possibly cancer-causing herbicide linked to Parkinson’s disease and thyroid problems. The leading cancer researchers at the World Health Organization recently classified glyphosate alone as ‘probably carcinogenic to humans.'”

4. GMOs impoverish biodiversity

GMOs require larger areas of land and intensive monoculture cultivation to reduce production costs. This in turn means farmers are displaced from their land and cultures and traditional knowledge are lost. In fact, a team of researchers reviewed 34 years of USDA census data on every recorded crop species grown in U.S. counties and found a “steady decline in diversity in almost every food-growing part of the country.” 

5. GMOs allow multinationals to control food

The multinational companies that patent and produce GMO seeds control the majority of the seed market and often also produce herbicides and fertilizers.

6. GMOs compromise food sovereignty for communities

How can organic, biodynamic and conventional farmers be sure that their crops haven’t been contaminated? The spread, even limited, of GMO cultivation in open fields will change the quality and state of our agriculture, taking away our freedom to choose what we cultivate and eat.

7. GMOs compromise freedom of choice for consumers

At the international level, labeling laws regarding GMO products lack uniformity and are insufficient. In Africa and Asia no legislation exists at all. In America there is no acknowledged difference between products containing GMOs and conventional products, and therefore it is not deemed necessary to inform consumers of the presence of GMOs. In Europe, producers are obliged to declare the presence of GMOs if in a quantity above 0.9%. However, also in Europe the majority of animal feeds commercially available contain genetically modified soya, but it is not obligatory to declare derivative products such as milk or meat on the label.

8. GMOs contribute to problems with bees and birds and an unbalanced ecosystem

In the last several years, numerous scientists have shown that neonicotinoids such as clothianidin are lethal for pollinators at agricultural field concentrations and are the most likely cause of colony collapse disorder in bees. Other studies show correlations between environmental neonics and the loss of birds, especially species that consume aquatic invertebrates.  

Learn more about herbicide use and GMO crops below.

STOP GMOs! 

Know that there shouldn’t be GMO seed available to consumers and is sold to producers only at this time, but you need to be aware of what is happening in our food supply chain as it could affect you in what you consume from the grocery store.

When choosing seed for your garden, always look for seed providers that have made a commitment to biodiversity and preserving seed DNA as seed stewards through non-GMO open-source, non-patented and heirloom seed (like seed grown by Grow Your Health Gardening.) Not only will you play a key role in helping to maintain biodiversity within our food supply, but you’ll also enjoy the nutritional benefit of these fantastic seeds!

Shop seeds adapted to growing in the southeast (hot and humid zone 7B) in hydroponic systems at store.growyourhealthgardening.com 

Sources: